Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence

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Domestic Violence: Finding Safety and Support

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Stalking

Stalking is a crime in New York State. Despite the now commonplace use of the term “stalking,” it is a serious safety risk and should be treated as such.

Stalking is a crime in New York State.

Stalking is one person’s unwanted pursuit of another person. While some stalkers are strangers or acquaintances of those they target, most are current or former spouses or intimate partners who “just won’t let go.” Stalking can occur during a relationship or after it has ended.

Many intimate partner stalkers also physically or sexually assault their victims or threaten to do so.

Stalking often involves the perpetrator:

“People may minimize your story. Don’t let anyone tell you you’re overreacting.”
— Domestic Violence Survivor

While some of the stalking behaviors listed above may not seem dangerous or threatening to an outsider – and may not be illegal on their own – a pattern of stalking is serious and should be treated that way. If you are being stalked, it is important to keep a record of what is happening. This can become useful evidence if you decide to get help from the police or court. Every time something happens, you should record:

Note: If you have texts or e-mails from the stalker on your phone, save them. If you go to the police, they may want to take photos of the messages as evidence.